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Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The Midas Plague by Frederik Pohl ,. Barry N. Malzberg Foreword. Although the three part serial beginning in the June issue in collaboration with Cyril Kornbluth had established Frederik Pohl as a formidable contributor, this novelette in the April issue was his first solo contribution and marked him as an important addition to the growing roster of social satirists enlisted by Horace Gold, the editor of GALAXY magazine.

The a Although the three part serial beginning in the June issue in collaboration with Cyril Kornbluth had established Frederik Pohl as a formidable contributor, this novelette in the April issue was his first solo contribution and marked him as an important addition to the growing roster of social satirists enlisted by Horace Gold, the editor of GALAXY magazine.

The idea lacks all credibility, everyone including Pohl told him and everyone refused to write something so patently unbelievable until, according to Pohl, Horace browbeat him into an attempt and Pohl decided that it was less trouble to deliver something than continue to resist. To his utter shock, the story was received by Gold and his readership with great glee, was among the most popular GALAXY ever published or Pohl and one of the most anthologized. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , 69 pages. Published October 1st by RosettaBooks first published June More Details Other Editions 5.

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Nov 20, Paul Bryant rated it it was ok Shelves: sf-novels-aaargh. In the future everyone has to consume products like crazy to keep their wildly overproductive society going. They have invented cheap energy and they have lots of robots. To enforce this, everyone is on rations. The poorer you are the more you have to consume, because all this using stuff up is backbreaking and mind-destroying work. Ha ha! I get it!

It's the opposite of our own society Like no one would have thought of that already. View all 4 comments. My Review : Rather entertaining, in a simple way. But as I read on, I had this chill of terror Thanks to LibraryThing Fred, I read this antique, sixty-year-old tale of consumerism's most appalling subtext writ large. It's hard not to see how this 12, or so word novelette would benefit from either more or less space. It would, in hands more skilled, have been side-splittingly funny. Pohl wasn't really up to it in But honestly, it was an hour spent smiling and frowning at the same time, as I processed the implications of the fact that people saw what was happening in the wake of consumerism in That chilled me.

I was hoping for a positive return of laughs, and got the smiles instead. But overall I'd say it's a good way to spend an afternoon. Very worthwhile for the Unlimited folks, less so for the money-spenders. View 2 comments.

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May 28, Will Capellaro rated it it was amazing. Classic Pohl Thoroughly digestible race through one of Frederik Pohl's classic propositions on society. This reads like a hard-boiled radio stage play. The Midas Plague was written shortly after World War Two, and like almost any book that old that deals with and imagined future, it contains many items that a modern reader will easily find fault with, since we KNOW how the future post 52 actually was.

I like it! The theme of this book reminds me of Vonnegut's Player Piano, though the premise is taken to an intentionally absurd level by Pohl. In his imaginary future there is so much produced by the "robots" that people a The Midas Plague was written shortly after World War Two, and like almost any book that old that deals with and imagined future, it contains many items that a modern reader will easily find fault with, since we KNOW how the future post 52 actually was.

In his imaginary future there is so much produced by the "robots" that people are FORCED to consume, and the lower on the social scale one is, the more one must consume. In both this and Vonnegut's book, the basic flaw in their premises is that they both assume, as many did at the time that the "wealth" produced by automation and robots would actually be shared. It was shared, to an extent, but certainly not with the entire population of the planet, or even the population of the wealthiest country on the planet.

From 60 years in the future, it seems rather quaint, though well written and with some humor and irony that still works. It's not a "must read" but for someone like me who enjoys old visions of the future, it's another example of a certain optimism that was common even in semi-dystopian novels of the time.

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Dec 03, Angelle Tusa rated it it was ok. A confusing story that seems to require a severe lack of logic in order for you to go with it. The short of it is the poorer people are in this world, the more rations they receive from the government and the more they are expected to consume rather than work. The abundance is apparently due to robots that just won't stop producing things, and that's where it loses me.

I guess it's the kind of thing people feared back then, of machines just endlessly spitting things out and eliminating need for A confusing story that seems to require a severe lack of logic in order for you to go with it. I guess it's the kind of thing people feared back then, of machines just endlessly spitting things out and eliminating need for people to work, but it ignores lots of other obvious things like cost and availability of materials, for instance. Beyond the concept, I couldn't quite tell if it was supposed to be a damning look at communism, welfare, consumerism, automation, or some strange mix of them all.

It just all got a bit too muddled up and resulted in an unsatisfying read. Jun 19, Rose rated it liked it. The Beautiful Fairy. Princess Loves A Prince. My Sister, My Best friend. The Lost Amethyst. The Fairy Tales Cookbook.

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The Midas Plague by Frederik Pohl

Death is not bad at all. If a cat wrote a story would you wonder what it would be? If your answer is "yes" then read this book! What if a Dinosaur Ate my Teacher?